More treasure-hunters could be forced to hand over hauls

Started by gash, February 04, 2019, 02:04:10 pm

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gash

More treasure-hunters could be forced to hand over hauls to museums as the Government wants any finds worth over £10,000 reported within 14 days

*  Amateur archaeologists have a legal obligation to report gold and silver objects
*  Government to widen what needs to be reported to goods £10,000 or more
*  In 2017 were 1,267 archaeological finds in Britain but few ended up in museums

New rules on what counts as 'treasure' could give museums a better chance of acquiring historic items before they disappear into private hands.

At present, amateur archaeologists and metal detectorists have a legal obligation to report gold and silver objects, and groups of coins more than 300 years old. Prehistoric base-metal items also qualify. The Government wants to widen the definition to include any finds that are worth more than £10,000.

Those who find a potential treasure are required to report it to a coroner within 14 days. If they deem an object to be treasure, the Treasure Valuation Committee decides how much the artefact is worth and who is entitled to it. In 2017 there were 1,267 archaeological finds in Britain but few ended up in museums.



In 2010 an important Roman helmet went to a private bidder for £2.3million, avoiding treasure laws because it was made of copper.

Heritage minister Michael Ellis said: 'Some outstanding artefacts of great importance have been lost to private sellers simply because they do not meet the current criteria.'

Michael Lewis of the British Museum said the Government's plan would help museums to 'acquire the most important archaeological finds for public benefit and to advance knowledge'.

Read more :  https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-6655415/More-treasure-hunters-forced-hand-hauls-museums.html
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